Addressing the Heresy of Sola Fide

Since Protestants confidently proclaim that faith alone is the solution to being saved, the question remains; why does scripture oppose this heretical and unbiblical doctrine? It’s quite evident within the scriptures that we are to do good works in response to having faith in Christ. This is called cooperating with God’s Grace. The scriptures state […]

Since Protestants confidently proclaim that faith alone is the solution to being saved, the question remains; why does scripture oppose this heretical and unbiblical doctrine?

It’s quite evident within the scriptures that we are to do good works in response to having faith in Christ. This is called cooperating with God’s Grace. The scriptures state that we are to imitate Christ in all things (Eph 5:1-2) and that we are to keep His Commandments (Rev 22:14) in order to be saved. 1 Peter 2:12 says that we are to be an example to the gentiles by our good deeds in order that they may glorify the True God. Matthew 5:16 reaffirms this same request, since our good works “shine before men.”

This is why Matthew 16:27 makes it absolutely clear that we will be judged by all the good works we have done to glorify God, for it states: “For the Son of Man is to come with His Angels in the Glory of His Father, and then He will repay every man for what he has done.”

Bear in mind that later in Matthew 25:31-46; Jesus speaks of separating the sheep from the goats in accordance to how they served God, the sheeps being the saved and the goats being the damned. The Protestant position of faith has no room within this scripture, for Jesus makes it clear that these good works, in absolute union with faith, are necessary for salvation as mentioned above.

Remember that even the Devils have faith in God, thus if we are to have faith alone and not do what God requests in this regards (Obeying the commandments, feeding the hungry etc.) we would only be cast away into Hell as “sinful and slothful servents.” (Matt 25:23-30) Did I forget to mention that the book of 2nd Corinthians 5:10 makes it absolutely clear that “all will be made manifest.. so that each one may receive what is due to him for the THINGS DONE while in the body, whether good or bad”?
Sounds like good works are necessary here for salvation. To reject this is to simply to be in self denial and pride. Had this not been true, Lazarus would have not been damned. (Matt 24:42-44)

In conclusion, faith without works is dead. “What does it profit, my brethren, if a man say he has faith but has not works? Can his faith save him?” (Luther would say yes… continuing… ) “If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to him “Go in peace, be warned and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead.” (James 2:14-17) Lets not forget James 2:26: “For as the Body apart from the spirit is dead, so faith apart from works is dead.”

Fun fact: Martin Luther, the founder of the heresy of Protestantism, desired to remove the book of James from the Bible because of this very key doctrine in which he invented. It’s ironic considering that not only had he removed 7 books from the Old Testament, but also accused the Catholic Church for being unbiblical and twisting scripture in which he has edited in order for it to fit his doctrines.


via Addressing the Heresy of Sola Fide — Holy Synergy

Salvation, Grace, and Reconciliation

Great thoughts on the subjects of grace and sin. Thanks Philip!

The Latin Community

francis-confessional-cropped-md7028rk0q0ae8edzr9ullhgmcgyf3kkivg1zrq2e8.jpg

The Sacrament of Reconciliation

  • The Church prior to the 1960s often spoke of Hell as being the punishment for sinning. However, even after the Vatican II council, the Church stressed its pastoral teaching on the goodness of Christ—both periods have failed to highlight our treasures in Heaven.
  • Who is going to Heaven?
  • How do you know?
  • Often we’re told that if we do good and are a good person that will qualify us for the reward of Heaven–This is not what the Catholic Church teaches. In fact, this teaching can be found in a heresy refuted by St. Augustine called Pelagianism.
  • We cannot get to Heaven by our own good actions.Jesus said, “If you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.”18[c]He asked him, “Which ones?” And Jesus replied, “ ‘You shall not kill; you shall not commit adultery; you shall not steal; you shall…

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Roman Catholics Are True Christians: Response to The Isaiah 53:5 Project

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The Isaiah 53:5 Project published a post titled Are Roman Catholics Christian? a little while back. The text of the short post reads:

I was recently asked by an atheist who, for his own enjoyment, loves to stir up conflict among believers where there often isn’t any if I thought Roman Catholics were true Christians. So, without intending to cause trouble or offend Catholics who read the blog, here is my answer.

“Catholics are indeed Christians if they have trusted in Jesus alone for the forgiveness of their sins. However, if they believe they are saved by God’s grace and their works, then they are not saved–even if they believe their works are done by God’s grace–since they then deny the sufficiency of Christ’s sacrifice.

“Being a Christian does not mean being a member of the Roman Catholic Church. It means being a member of the body of Christ, which is accomplished by faith and trust in Jesus alone for the forgiveness of your sins. It means you do not add your works to His work. Sincerity doesn’t forgive sins. Membership in a church doesn’t forgive sins. Doing works of penance doesn’t forgive sins. Praying to Mary doesn’t forgive sins. Forgiveness is received in the faithful trust and acceptance of Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross.

“You must trust Jesus, God in flesh, for the forgiveness of sins–not a man-made ritual and certainly not the catholic saints.

Even though the Roman Catholic Church affirms the Trinity, the deity of Christ, and His physical resurrection, it greatly errors in its doctrine of salvation by adding works to salvation.”

I’d like to comment on the immense ignorance of the implications of the above article.

The performance of good works does not deny the sufficiency of Christ’s Sacrifice. Good works are required for salvation, but works themselves do not save. To use an analogy, a key is required to drive a car, but the key is not the reason the car runs. There is an engine under the hood with all sorts of components that make the car go. While the key is not what gets us driving places in itself, it is needed, or else the car is useless. The same is true for good works.

Catholics do not deny that faith is needed for salvation. “But without faith it is impossible to please God. For he that cometh to God, Must believeth that he is, and is a rewarder to them that seek him.” (Heb. 11:6)

Faith is absolutely necessary to get to Heaven. If a Christian did not have faith, then he wouldn’t exactly be a Christian, because he doesn’t believe in Christ. We must believe in God and place our trust in Him.

Faith must be working in charity (Galatians5:6)

Faith without charity, is nothing. Faith is dependent on charity (1 Corinthians 13:1-3)

If any man love not our Lord Jesus Christ, let him be anathema, maranatha.” (1 Cor. 16:22)

“Dearly beloved, let us love one another, for charity is of God. And every one that loveth, is born of God, and knoweth God.” (1 John 4:7)

“And now there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity.” (1 Cor. 13:13)

Love is essential! If a man was to place His faith in Christ and yet go through life having hatred for his neighbor, would he end up in Heaven? Not without love. St. Paul says that “there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity” (1 Cor. 13:13). If we are saved by faith only, then why is charity (love) greater than faith?

Love of God and neighbor is a matter of life and death, for even though a person has divine faith as a free commitment to Christ, if he has not charity—and the deeds of charity where need requires and capacity exists—he cannot be saved (Mt 7:22; Jn 15:2; 1 Cor 6:9-11; Gal 5:19-21; Jas 2:17;).

Faith cannot stand on its own. We must cooperate with God’s grace for it to be effective.


 

To be a true Christian is to be a Catholic. The Catholic Church was started by Christ, and can trace its lineage all the way back to Him. Any other “church” is just the product of mere men; the Catholic Church was began by God.

Do you wish to remain in your man-made traditions, or come home to Christ’s Church?

— Patrick E. Devens, The Catholic Thinker


 

Source: Are Roman Catholics Christian?

Repentance: Must We Turn From Sin? Response to Lee Poskey

Repentance poster

Blogger Lee Poskey ( https://leeposkey.wordpress.com/ ) recently published an article condemning the notion that repentance, turning away from sin, was necessary for salvation. The original article link is at the bottom.

Lee wrote:

“The salvation statement in the screenshot above is a false gospel. Why? Because it teaches that repentance of sins, (turning from sins) is a component of receiving salvation.”

(My own emphasis added)

The part of the screenshot containing ‘repentance’ that Lee is condemning is below.

Capture

I do not wish to discuss the matter of faith in salvation, just touch on repentance.

According to Lee, a person can attain salvation without turning away from sin. Does this mean I can purposely continue sinning all through my life, then go to Heaven after I die? I need not make any changes in my life after becoming Christian; I can continue in my sinful ways and still expect to enter the pearly gates after I die? Sounds a bit illogical.

No one thinks that they will be rescued from a sinking ship if they remain onboard. Why should someone expect to enter Heaven if they do not turn away from sin? After His interaction with Mary Magdalene (John 8:11), why did Christ tell her to go and sin no more? In Revelation 21:27, John writes, speaking of Heaven, “nothing unclean shall enter it.” How can someone stay in the way of sin, and still enter eternal life?

No, in order to enter into eternal life we must stay clear of sin and keep God’s commandments. Turning from sin is not an option — its a requirement.

— Patrick E. Devens

 


Source: What do you do with this?

Response to Pilgrim’s Progress on Sola Fide and Good Works

“Patrick, you must know that we teach Sola Gratia as well as Sola Fide and so you can’t say that Sola Fide is deficient because it doesn’t contain or seems to ignore Sola Gratia: again, they must be taken as a whole and not separated except for the purpose of explanation.” – “Answering The Catholic Thinker on Faith Alone (Sola Fide) and works”

I believe that Sola Fide is deficient in the fact that it focuses solely on faith (hence the phrase “faith alone”) instead of the necessity of faith and good works. Don’t get me wrong, Catholics are not forgetting about the important factor of faith. Without faith in Christ, no man can be saved. My point is that you cannot treat good works as unnecessary or merely optional. That is to say that a Christian can go through life believing in Christ, but obeying Christ, that is performing good works is not necessary. That person will still go to Heaven for not obeying Christ’s commands. How strange does that sound? If you have faith in Christ, then you would make the choice to obey His commands, and regard them as necessary, not unneeded.

“Genuine Bible-believing Christians (Protestants and Evangelicals) aren’t antinomians, which is the implication of your post. Yes, there are some who live as though one can sin all they like since they once “made a decision for Christ,” but that is not what the Bible teaches and what we hold. Genuine Christians aren’t lawless and don’t promote lawlessness. Christians understand Paul and James together, that is, that good works demonstrate that we have saving faith – living Faith – for as you note, even the demons know that God exists.” – “Answering The Catholic Thinker on Faith Alone (Sola Fide) and works”

I didn’t mean to paint non-Catholic Christians as lawless individuals, but was talking about how they view works as unnecessary, and the implications of such. Good works are faith in action, which makes it just as necessary as belief itself. Faith and works are two sides of one coin.

“Again, Martin Luther did not invent Faith Alone. The Bible teaches it, and it was taught by Patristics such as Clement of Rome, Irenaeus of Lyons, and John Chrysostom:

‘Similarly we also, who by His will have been called in Christ Jesus, are not justified by ourselves, or our own wisdom or understanding or godliness, nor by such deeds as we have done in holiness of heart, but by that faith through which Almighty God has justified all men since the beginning of time. Glory be to Him, forever and ever, Amen.’ – St. Clement of Rome (? – ~101 AD) (Letter to the Corinthians,  par. 32)

‘Human beings can be saved from the ancient wound of the serpent in no other way than by believing in him who, when he was raised up from the earth on the tree of martyrdom in the likeness of sinful flesh, drew all things to himself and gave life to the dead.’ – St. Irenaeus (130 – 202 AD) (Against the Heresies, IV, 2, 7)

‘They said that he who adhered to faith alone was cursed; but he, Paul, shows that he who adhered to faith alone is blessed.’- St. John Chrysostom (347 – 407 AD) (Homily on Galatians 3)” – “Answering The Catholic Thinker on Faith Alone (Sola Fide) and works”

The passage from Clement is merely dealing with the reason for performing good works. Before your excerpt the text reads:

“All these, therefore, were highly honoured, and made great, not for their own sake, or for their own works, or for the righteousness which they wrought, but through the operation of His will.”

Clement was speaking about the reason behind performing works; is it for our own gratification or performing God’s will. Because while preaching that we are justified by faith, Clement at the same time says that the people of Juda were made great through the “operation of His will”. Notice that nowhere did Clement teach faith alone. He merely said that we are not justified of our own doing,; we need to cooperate with God’s grace, the operation of the Divine will.

Irenaeus speaks about being brought out of the wound of the serpent (sin) by belief in Christ. To be saved we must believe in Christ, but that is not to say that works are not necessary. Works do not cause salvation, but are necessary for it to happen. We must obey God’s commands in addition to placing our faith in Him.

I cannot comment on the Chrysostom quote because I couldn’t find the excerpt in his 3rd homily on Galatians. That is not to say that you made it up, but that I cannot find it. The main message from Chrysostom’s homily is that we are not saved by the works of the Law, and that the Law is unneeded now. He spoke of the importance of faith and the needlessness of the Old Law, but I couldn’t find “faith alone”. This is the link I used:

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/23103.htm

God bless,

Patrick E. Devens

 

 

 

The Safety-Net of Sola Fide

The Protestant doctrine of Sola Fide originates from the time of the Protestant Revolt, and was created by Revolutionist Martin Luther. It is one of five “Solae”, the others being:

Sola Scriptura (Scripture Alone )

Sola Gratia (Grace Alone)

Solo Christo (Christ Alone)

Soli Deo Gloria (Glory to God Alone)

The doctrine of Sola Fide states that a Christian can attain salvation by grace through faith alone-without works of any kind, as they do not effect salvation. Consequently, any sin (short of apostasy) also does not effect salvation. A Christian’s sins and imperfections are “covered”, so to speak, after he has been saved from damnation by “accepting Jesus Christ as his personal Lord and Savior”. After being “saved” solely by his act of faith, there is nothing that can keep the Christian from eternal glory. He now has “eternal security” and is assured that at death he will enjoy the bliss of Heaven.

Sounds a little to good to be true, doesn’t it?

The fact of the matter is that the doctrine of Sola Fide is false. This heretical teaching has been leading many Christians astray since the time of its creation in the 1500s. Truthfully, Sola Fide is a man-made tradition that nullifies the Word of God, the kind that Jesus Christ explicitly condemned (Matt. 15:2-6).

Let’s look and see what is necessary for salvation from a biblical standpoint, along with what the Early Church Fathers have to say on the matter. The following requirements for salvation are the same teachings that the Roman Catholic Church has taught since its establishment by Jesus Christ in 30 A.D. God gave man the knowledge of necessity means to attain Heaven long ago, and then the Protestants of the 1500s decide that they knew better than Divine Providence.

What is Necessary for Salvation?

Grace

For by grace you are saved through faith, and that not of yourselves, for it is a gift of God; Not of works, that no man may glory. For we are his workmanship, created in Jesus Christ for good works, which God hath prepared that we should walk in them.” (Eph. 2:8-10)

The gift of God’s grace is essential to salvation, as the text of Paul’s letter to the Ephesians says we are saved by it. We are not saved by the works that we perform, rather the grace that God freely gives us.

Evangelicals sometimes point to this text to prove Sola Fide. This text no where teaches the supposed reality of Sola Fide. It says we are saved by grace, the gift of God, through faith. Paul emphasizes that salvation is a gift; we cannot get to Heaven merely by our own works. Yet we are to most certainly perform good works, since the text says that we were created for them. This passage nowhere says we are saved solely by faith. The message is that we are saved by grace.

Faith

But without faith it is impossible to please God. For he that cometh to God, Must believeth that he is, and is a rewarder to them that seek him.” (Heb. 11:6)

Faith is absolutely necessary to get to Heaven. If a Christian did not have faith, then he wouldn’t exactly be a Christian, because he doesn’t believe in Christ. We must believe in God and place our trust in Him.

Faith must be working in charity (Galatians5:6)

Faith without charity, is nothing. Faith is dependent on charity (1 Corinthians 13:1-3)

Love

If any man love not our Lord Jesus Christ, let him be anathema, maranatha.” (1 Cor. 16:22)

“Dearly beloved, let us love one another, for charity is of God. And every one that loveth, is born of God, and knoweth God.” (1 John 4:7)

“And now there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity.” (1 Cor. 13:13)

Love is essential! If a man was to place His faith in Christ and yet go through life having hatred for his neighbor, would he end up in Heaven? Not without love. St. Paul says that “there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity” (1 Cor. 13:13). If we are saved by faith only, then why is charity (love) greater than faith?

Love of God and neighbor is a matter of life and death, for even though a person has divine faith as a free commitment to Christ, if he has not charity—and the deeds of charity where need requires and capacity exists—he cannot be saved (Mt 7:22; Jn 15:2; 1 Cor 6:9-11; Gal 5:19-21; Jas 2:17;).

Obedience

“And being consummated, he became, to all that obey him, the cause of eternal salvation.” (Heb. 5:9)

It should be noted that faith is more than merely  believing. Faith requires obedience (Romans 1:5, 16:26)

Can faith save without obedience? No, that is a dead faith. Man is not justified by “faith only.(James 2:24)

Hebrews 5:9 states that Christ became the cause of salvation, to those who obey Him. If you have faith, but do not obey His Commandments, will you attain Heaven?

Baptism (Membership of Christ’s Church)

He that believeth and is baptized, shall be saved: but he that believeth not shall be condemned.” (Mark 16:16)

“Jesus answered: Amen, amen I say to thee, unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.” (John 3:5)

“Because the husband is the head of the wife, as Christ is the head of the church. He is the savior of his body.” (Eph. 5:23)

Notice the fact that Mark 16:16 says those who believe and be baptized will be saved. Not “If you believe you will be saved, baptism is optional.”

The argument about the correct interpretation surrounding John 3:5 seems quite illogical to me. The Catholic Church has always recognized this verse as meaning the waters of Baptism, through which the Holy Spirit makes His abode in the recipient. Other non-Catholics for instance, have sometimes made the argument that the “water” that is needed to be born again is Amniotic fluid from the womb. When I first saw this particular argument, I was amazed at the lengths non-believers will go to in order to attempt to prove the inefficacy of Baptism. If Jesus was truly attempting to say that a person must first be born bodily to be saved (born of water, amniotic fluid) He very well would have said that, perhaps something along the lines of “first you must be born of the flesh”.

The Catholic Church has always taught that Baptism makes a person a member of Christ’s Church.  (1 Corinthians 12:13) If Baptism is necessary for salvation, as commanded by Christ, then by default, that means that participation in His Church is needed as well. It would be foolish for a person to “believe” and “have faith”, but not choose to belong to the Church Christ has established.

Christ is the savior of His Body. If you are not part of the Body of Christ (the Church), will you be saved?

Lifelong Faithfulness

“And you shall be hated by all men for my name’s sake: but he that shall persevere unto the end, he shall be saved.” (Mt. 10:22)

“Fear none of those things which thou shalt suffer. Behold, the devil will cast some of you into prison that you may be tried: and you shall have tribulation ten days. Be thou faithful until death: and I will give thee the crown of life.” (Rev. 2:10)

Christ always taught that after acceptance of His commandments, His followers must obey them the rest of their life if they wished to join Him in Heaven one day. It was not taught that once a person “accepted Christ as their personal Lord and Savior” that they were guaranteed salvation. A Christian must “persevere to the end”.


 

No one taught “faith alone” (in the sense he meant it, which is the sense modern Protestants mean it) until Luther – it was his new and novel teaching. No wonder that Martin disliked the book of James so much (he was quoted saying he wanted to throw “Jimmy” into the fire), considering that it is centered around the importance of faith and works. A question I ask to anyone reading this, who believes Sola Fide, is if Martin Luther “discovered” this doctrine, then that means Christians were all in the dark about how to attain Heaven up to this point in history, right? That means that no one knew that it was faith alone that saved, and it took a man like Luther all the way to the 1500s to make it known to Christians? Highly unreasonable.

As for the doctrine itself, consider the verses:

Is mere belief in Christ enough? After all, devils believe, and are still damned. (James 2:19-20)

People in the Bible “believed” in Jesus but would not confess Him, because they loved the praises of men more than the praises of God. Were they saved? (John 12:42-43)

I don’t think these people were saved, judging by the verses.

If a verse states that faith is needed for salvation, it is true, but it at the same time does not exclude other things needed in a person (Charity, Obedience, etc…). If salvation requires more than only faith, then that renders Sola Fide dead in its tracks, doesn’t it?

It seems that whenever a Protestant tries to tell a person about salvation, all the person does is refer to the Epistles of Paul, leaving out much of what Jesus taught.  The issue is not that Catholics teach that faith is not needed; faith is necessary. The problem is Protestants not recognizing the importance of works–seemingly ignoring Jesus’ teaching. Consider Matthew 19:16-23, when asked by the rich man what is required that he may be saved, Jesus says:

“If you want to enter life, keep the commandments…If you want to be perfect, go, sell your possessions and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.” (17,21)

Likewise, when Jesus speaks of the Final Judgment, in Matthew 25, he tells of the good and the bad rendering reward or punishment according to their works. The good are rewarded with Heaven due to the good works they performed while on earth, not based solely on their faith in Christ. The bad are not sent to Hell solely because they did not place their faith in Christ, but because they neglected to perform good works. Nowhere in this passage (Matt. 25:31-46) is the factor of salvation by faith alone brought up. If Sola Fide were true, then would it not be logical for Christ to have judged the good and bad based on their faith? If Sola Fide were true, wouldn’t “faith alone” be the most pronounced teaching of the Bible, since it deals with our spiritual end? But Sola Fide is not taught anywhere in the Bible, implicitly or explicitly, as a single verse or the Bible as a whole.

Salvation by faith alone is as silly and unscriptural as “Salvation by repentance alone” or “Salvation by works alone”.  Salvation is not solely centered on one thing alone!

Anyone who adheres to the idea of Sola Fide is ignoring many things concerning salvation that God has spoken to us. The bible says that we are to live by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God (Matthew 4:4), not bits and pieces of it. In Acts 20:20, Paul says that in preaching, he did not keep back any profitable information from the Gentiles. Those who teach Sola Fide, are they not keeping back information concerning salvation? What of good works; obedience?

The Bible speaks highly of obedience.

  • We are to purify our souls by the obedience of charity (1 Peter 1:22-23)
  • Those who were previously servants of sin have changed their ways through obedience from the heart (Romans 6:17).
  • We must obey Christ in order to enter Heaven, not only believe in Him (Luke 6:46, Matthew 7:21-27)
  • We must keep God’s commandments (1 John 5:3). If we do not strive to keep God’s commands, then we do not truly love God. If you do not love God, can you go to Heaven?
  • Those who do not obey Christ’s Gospel will be cast into Hell (2 Thessalonians 1:8-9).

 

Many Protestants may point to verses in which it appears that God is condemning good works, which would bolster Sola Fide. Some of the most used passages are:

  • “But knowing that man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ; we also believe in Christ Jesus, that we may be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law: because by the works of the law no flesh shall be justified.” (Galatians 2:16)
  • “Because by the works of the law no flesh shall be justified before him. For by the law is the knowledge of sin.” (Romans 3:20)
  • “For we account a man to be justified by faith, without the works of the law.” (Romans 3:28)

In all the verses above, Paul does not condemn good works–but rather the works of the Jewish Law. After Christ’s Sacrifice on the cross,  the old Jewish Law was unneeded; the Old Testament was closed. No one can be justified through the works of the Law. That is what Paul constantly condemns–the works of the Law, not good works themselves!

The whole problem between Catholics and Protestants concerning salvation is not that Catholics promote “works salvation” (the Catholic Church has always taught we are saved by grace), but that Protestants who preach Sola Fide are ignoring parts of God’s Word! They isolate passages, and apply their own theology to the verses meanings.

The Early Church Fathers taught the same doctrine as the Catholic Church — both faith and works are necessary; works effect our salvation.

Justin Martyr

“We have learned from the prophets and we hold it as true that punishments and chastisements and good rewards are distributed according to the merit of each man’s actions. Were this not the case, and were all things to happen according to the decree of fate, there would be nothing at all in our power. If fate decrees that this man is to be good and that one wicked, then neither is the former to be praised nor the latter to be blamed” (First Apology 43 [A.D. 151]).

Tertullian

“Again, we [Christians] affirm that a judgment has been ordained by God according to the merits of every man” (To the Nations 19 [A.D. 195]).

“A good deed has God for its debtor [cf. Prov. 19:17], just as also an evil one; for a judge is the rewarder in every case [cf. Rom. 13:3–4]” (Repentance 2:11 [A.D. 203]).

Hippolytus

“Standing before [Christ’s] judgment, all of them, men, angels, and demons, crying out in one voice, shall say: ‘Just is your judgment,’ and the justice of that cry will be apparent in the recompense made to each. To those who have done well, everlasting enjoyment shall be given; while to lovers of evil shall be given eternal punishment” (Against the Greeks 3 [A.D. 212]).

Cyprian of Carthage

The Lord denounces [Christian evildoers], and says, ‘Many shall say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in your name, and in your name have cast out devils, and in your name done many wonderful works?And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, you who work iniquity’ [Matt. 7:21–23]. There is need of righteousness, that one may deserve well of God the Judge; we must obey his precepts and warnings, that our merits may receive their reward” (The Unity of the Catholic Church 15, 1st ed. [A.D. 251]).

Council of Orange II

“[G]race is preceded by no merits. A reward is due to good works, if they are performed, but grace, which is not due, precedes [good works], that they may be done” (Canons on grace 19 [A.D. 529]).

My point is that Sola Fide is a doctrine that ignores God’s Word concerning the importance of obedience (good works), is not historical, and sets a Christian up with a false sense of their salvation being secured solely by their faith.

If you believe, is that all that is needed to save you? The devils believe in Christ — they have felt His power alright! The devils believe, and yet they are damned. If belief alone enough to save you? Maybe its time to rethink Sola Fide…

“May I not come before You with empty hands, since we are rewarded according to our deeds.” St. Teresa of Avila

 

God bless,

Patrick Devens